Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Students with Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Freebie


Children with ODD frequently argue and throw tantrums. They get angry a lot and show their anger through disruptive behaviors. These actions make it hard for children with ODD to maintain positive relationships. They also do not like to comply with adult requests. Normally, they become angry when an adult makes a request because they feel that the request is not reasonable. I'm going to suggest a few things that may help manage a student that shows signs of ODD. 

1. Avoid I statements. Examples: "I like the way you ______." or "I really wish you would ______." Instead give praise that makes them feel ownership over the task or choice they made. Using I statements make the child feel like they've lost control. 

2. When providing directions during class instruction, be sure the student understands the purpose of the assignment. This can be a challenge because the student may not agree with the purpose. Try to connect it with something that they like personally. 

3. Students with ODD, a lot of times, do not like public attention. Praise them privately with a thumbs up, post-it note, or even a brag note to the parents! 

4. Constructive criticism should only be given in private! Always start off with something positive and, allow the student to express their concerns.

5. Give the student a personal schedule. This will allow the student to refer back to the schedule at any time of the day. This will give them security and could easily eliminate some behavior issues. 

6. Give the student breaks (5-10 minutes) and allow them to complete their work in chunks. To provide a worksheet in chunks, fold half of the worksheet or cut the worksheet into separate pieces. 

7. Know your student! Collect data and learn what triggers your student. Learn what they like and do not like. Be watchful of signs that may appear before a student has an episode. This will also help eliminate some of the defiant behaviors. 

I hope I've posted something that is helpful to someone! Go to my TPT store to download a free weekly progress and behavior form that can be sent home to parents. I'd love to have your feedback! If there is something you'd like added to this form, please let me know. I'll do my best to assist you!



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18 comments:

  1. Great post! I find these tips to be very helpful in my classroom as well.
    Pam
    Mrspspecialties.blogspot.com

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  2. Thanks for the nice comment! :-) Have a wonderful Christmas!

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  3. I like the idea of cutting the work page in half!

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  4. As a pediatric OT at a state mental hospital, I definitely try to utilize as much sensory-based stuff as possible. Finding different ways to help your student self-regulate (or at least begin learning how) can save you a ton of headaches and help your kiddo become more independent. Examples include having the child assist with moving around big items (desks, etc.) during wiggle breaks (even if you don't need to), carrying books to/from class for the library, having them perform heavy work activities during their wiggle breaks is another great way to help them calm via sensorimotor coping strategies. We definitely encourage self-breaks and then provide scheduled breaks (we're talking 5 minutes tops) to allow some autonomy and, if possible, build a sensory corner in your room - make it into a cave of sorts - someplace small, dark, and safe and fill it with calming sensorimotor items - weighted blankets (you can make your own), back massagers, fidgets, calming scents, etc.

    Consider some sort of behavior support/reward program with rewards picked out by the child. Consider having them help set their goals as well.

    That ended up being a bit of a ramble but hopefully some ideas were helpful to at least get you thinking about some new tactics to utilize. What you talk about in this post is spot-on!

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  5. Thanks for a wonderful resource for those who must work to understand anyone who is having trouble getting out of their own way. I'd like some examples of reframing remarks from "I" statements to more neutral, observations focusing on productive behaviors, especially when I'm overwhelmed by the force of the negativity directed outward.

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    1. Hi. I was thinking of the same thing too. I think more like saying their name, like this...Richard, YOU made a good choice getting out your book so quietly. It puts the compliment all about them instead of what the teacher thinks, Richard, I like the way you.....
      This is my take on this. It is amazing how playing with words makes such a difference.

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  6. Any tips on a 3 year old possibly with this disorder

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  7. Great ideas from everyone. I have one student this year who disrupts the lessons by moving her desk and chairs or banging on things. She "hates" all lessons except reading to herself. She is now into saying, "Blah, blah , blah" as a way of complaining and attention seeking. Any suggestions for this second grader?

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  8. Great ideas from everyone. I have one student this year who disrupts the lessons by moving her desk and chairs or banging on things. She "hates" all lessons except reading to herself. She is now into saying, "Blah, blah , blah" as a way of complaining and attention seeking. Any suggestions for this second grader?

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  9. My daughter was like that in first grade, we discovered it was mostly because she feared the next subject because she was struggling and felt so far behind the other students. So any time there was a transition from subject to subject she would refuse to move or would lock herself in the bathroom, or would make annoying noises. We got her some tutoring in subjects (mostly reading) that as she caught up, the behaviours lessoned. She still struggles but it doesn't show up in the classroom as much.

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  10. My daughter was like that in first grade, we discovered it was mostly because she feared the next subject because she was struggling and felt so far behind the other students. So any time there was a transition from subject to subject she would refuse to move or would lock herself in the bathroom, or would make annoying noises. We got her some tutoring in subjects (mostly reading) that as she caught up, the behaviours lessoned. She still struggles but it doesn't show up in the classroom as much.

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  11. Lori - I work with the same type of student. But, add hissing, calling people swear words, standing on desks... I see that you posted in April, but I'd love to know what might have worked best for you. So far, we've found that our student likes to help with teacher tasks (handing out papers, answering the door, etc), and that'll distract her unless she's past a certain point. Good luck everyone!

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I see that I replied to everyone (not just Lori). I'm loving the suggestions on this page, and I'll take extra help from anyone!

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  12. I worry that this kind of behavior leads to entitled children who don't understand that they will HAVE to submit to someone in charge of them. At what point do they learn respect and obedience???

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  13. I dearly hope you are not a teacher!

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  14. They do learn respect. Those that work with them just need to learn different strategies. My awesome son that experiences ODD is very respectful when he feels safe in his environment. His 5th grade teacher tells me each time we meet that he is one of the most respectful students that she's ever had and she's been teaching for over 20 years. By the way, ODD is a legitimate disorder so no one is making this stuff up.

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  15. They do learn respect. Those that work with them just need to learn different strategies. My awesome son that experiences ODD is very respectful when he feels safe in his environment. His 5th grade teacher tells me each time we meet that he is one of the most respectful students that she's ever had and she's been teaching for over 20 years. By the way, ODD is a legitimate disorder so no one is making this stuff up.

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